Leadership

Jason Craig

Jason Craig

VP of Program

Jason Craig grew up in two homes – sometimes with his mom and sometimes with his dad, but he moved in with his dad full time at age 12. “For a lot of my friends, their father was a blank in their minds,” Jason explains, “They just were not around.  But my dad took me in at a critical age and showed me that fathers love and protect their sons.  Later it made sense to me that God would send His Son to save me – dads do that for their boys.”

Jason fell into typical teenage vices, but everything changed after he was mentored by a mature Christian man and led to accept the Christian faith.  Jason has been working with youth ever since.

After a failed attempt at showing a Catholic friend why Catholicism was nonsense, Jason became a Catholic, along with his future-wife Katie, who grew up in an atheist home.  After being received into the Church, Jason and Katie entered the world of full-time Catholic ministry.  However, as Jason applied his knowledge and experience of youth ministry at a Catholic parish he realized that it was the families, especially the fathers that had the greatest impact.  During this time Jason joined Justin Biance and Tommy Van Horn in founding Fraternus, and Jason wrote and developed the training and curriculum used today around the country.  Jason has a Masters in Theology and Evangelization from the Augustine Institute, and continues his studies and work from a small farm in rural NC.  His writings on culture, masculinity, and mentoring have appeared on numerous sites like New Advent, Catholic Exchange, and Those Catholic Men, and he is working on a book on rites of passage for Catholic boys.  He is also known to staunchly defend his family’s claim to have invented bourbon.

Joshua Johnson

Joshua Johnson

Vice President, Finance and Development

Joshua Johnson, whose story you can watch on “The Journey Home” on EWTN, has experienced the impact of mentoring firsthand. Thanks to mentoring he received as a young man, he left a career in political fundraising to become a United Methodist Pastor, and eventually found himself resigning from the pastorate and becoming a Catholic.

Prior to joining the Fraternus staff in 2014, Josh started a Fraternus Chapter at Our Lady Star of the Sea in Bremerton, WA and founded and worked as the Executive Director of Catholics United for Life of the Northwest. He has extensive experience in ministry, organizational development, nonprofit governance and fundraising. He holds a Master’s of Theological Studies (Magna Cum Laude) from Duke University, a BS in Government (Cum Laude) from Liberty University and is currently working on a Master’s in Philanthropy and Development from St. Mary’s University of Minnesota.

Josh lives in South Carolina where he is happily married to Katie and has been blessed with four children, Joshua Jr., Elizabeth Anne, Juliana, and Dominic. He enjoys hiking, camping, traveling and adventures to new places with family.

Thomas Connelly

Thomas Connelly

Program Director

Thomas spent the first fifteen years of his life in South Carolina. After the conversion of his parents to the Catholic Church when he was five, his family put forth intentional effort to know the faith well.

He spent time discerning a vocation in the seminary of the Legion of Christ, but in 2016 he discerned that God was not calling him to the priesthood. While in seminary Thomas spent time in Canada, Italy, South Korea, the Philippines and different parts of the US, and is eager to find out what God has been preparing him for through these experiences.

Throughout his seminary years Thomas had the great blessing and opportunity to be mentored by great priests and religious and passes on this privilege through mentoring young men from South Carolina to South Korea. The diversity of his experience helps him to bring the faith everywhere from a tiny island in the Philippines to the sprawling suburbs of the US.

Thomas has an associates in Humanities, and his Bachelor’s in Philosophy from Regina Apostolorum in Rome. He is also certified by the Theology of the Body Institute. Because of the multicultural nature of the seminary Thomas, while retaining his American heritage, considers himself to be part Mexican, part Korean, part Italian, and perhaps a little Brazilian, at least when they are cooking churrasco. Thomas speaks Spanish, French, Italian, and Korean. He also knows a bit of Latin and ancient Greek but the natives say his accent is atrocious.